America Dedicated to God

On April 30th, 1789, America had a Constitution and a newly formed government. On that day, the government, the House, and the Senate gathered for the Inauguration of our first president, George Washington. In his Inauguration Address, Washington gave a prophetic warning: “We ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and the right which heaven itself has ordained.” Washington’s warning was, if we would begin to depart from God, He would remove His blessings, His prosperity and His protection from our nation.

After Washington’s address, the government, the House, the Senate, and America’s first president traveled on foot to Saint Paul’s Chapel. No one knows exactly what was said inside but we do know the entire government was on their knees praying and consecrating this nation to God. In the chapel there is also a plaque above Washington’s pew with the words “Almighty God, we make our earnest prayer that you will keep the United States in Holy protection.” Saint Paul’s Chapel is located at the corner of Ground Zero and is the spiritual birthplace of America.

America’s first Presidential Inauguration – that of President George Washington – incorporated seven specific religious activities, including[1] the use of the Bible to administer the oath;[2] affirming the religious nature of the oath by the adding the prayer “So help me God!” to the oath;[3] inaugural prayers offered by the president;[4] religious content in the inaugural address;[5] civil leaders calling the people to prayer or acknowledgement of God;[6] inaugural worship services attended en masse by Congress as an official part of congressional activities;[7] and clergy-led inaugural prayers.[8]

Blessings, Tom Hughes – President
allianceforreligiousfreedom@gmail.com
“In all your ways, acknowledge Him…” Proverbs 3:6

Sources:

http://www.wallbuilders.com/downloads/newsletter/H.Res.888.pdf

[1] See, for example, The Federal and State Constitutions: Colonial Charters, and Other Organic Laws of the States, Territories and Colonies Now or Heretofore Forming the United States of America, compiled and edited under the Act of Congress of June 30, 1908, by Francis Newton Thorpe (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1909), 7 volumes; see also http://www.constitution.org/cons/usstcons.htm;

[2] See, for example, The History of the Centennial Celebration of George Washington as First President of the United States,Clarence Winthrop Bowen, editor (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1892), p. 51; Benson J. Lossing, Washington and the American Republic (New York: Virtue & Yorston, 1870), Vol. III, p. 93; and numerous others.

[3] See, for example, The History of the Centennial Celebration of George Washington as First President of the United States, Clarence Winthrop Bowen, editor (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1892), p. 52; Benson J. Lossing, Washington and the American Republic (New York: Virtue & Yorston, 1870), Vol. III, p. 93; and numerous others.

[4] James D. Richardson, A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents (Published by Authority of Congress, 1897), George Washington, Vol. 1, p.44, April 30th, 1789.

[5] James D. Richardson, A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents (Published by Authority of Congress, 1897), George Washington, Vol. 1, pp. 44-45, April 30th, 1789.

[6] The Daily Advertiser, New York, Thursday, April 23, 1789, p. 2; see also The History of the Centennial Celebration of George Washington as First President of the United States, Clarence Winthrop Bowen, editor (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1892), p. 41, and many other sources.

[7] Senate: Annals of Congress (1834), Vol. I, p. 25, April 27, 1789; House: Annals of Congress (1834), Vol. I, p. 241, April 29, 1789.

[8] George Bancroft, History of the Formation of the Constitution of the United States of America (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1882), Vol. II, p. 363; see also The History of the Centennial Celebration of George Washington as First President of the United States, Clarence Winthrop Bowen, editor (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1892), p. 54, and many other sources.

 

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